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Videa shodující se s "supernova"

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In the 22nd century, a medical rescue team travelling deep space receives a distress signal from a group of workers involved in a mining operation on the moon Titan 37. As they move in for a rescue, they soon discover that this isn't the mission of mercy they were expecting.
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K Zemi se blíží tlaková vlna supernovy. Už zničila Pluto a tři vědci - americký profesor Kelvin, profesorka Huan Ye z Číny a profesor Jižinsky z Ruska - se přou, zda jaderné hlavice odpálit uvnitř magnetosféry nebo vně. Všude řádí tornáda, zemětřesení a blesky, jen na základně NASA svítí slunce. Trojice vědců odstartuje raketoplánem, na oběžné dráze jim přestanou fungovat počítače... Podaří se jim ručně přeprogramovat místo výbuchu a tím Zemi zachránit?
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How big can they get? What's the largest so far detected? Where does an 18 billion solar mass black hole hide? We've never seen them directly... yet we know they are there... Lurking within dense star clusters... Or wandering the dust lanes of the galaxy.... Where they prey on stars... Or swallow planets whole. Our Milky Way may harbor millions of these black holes... the ultra dense remnants of dead stars. But now, in the universe far beyond our galaxy, there's evidence of something even more ominous... A breed of black holes that have reached incomprehensible size and destructive power. It has taken a new era in astronomy to find them... High-tech instruments in space tuned to sense high-energy forms of light -- x-rays and gamma rays -- that are invisible to our eyes. New precision telescopes equipped with technologies that allow them to cancel out the blurring effects of the atmosphere... and see to the far reaches of the universe. Peering into distant galaxies, astronomers are now finding evidence that space and time can be shattered by eruptions so vast they boggle the mind. We are just beginning to understand the impact these outbursts have had on the universe around us. That understanding recently took a leap forward. A team operating at the Subaru Observatory atop Hawaii's Mauna Kea volcano looked out to one of the deepest reaches of the universe... And captured a beam of light that had taken nearly 13 billion years to reach us. It was a messenger from a time not long after the universe was born. They focused on an object known as a quasar... short for "quasi-stellar radio source." It offered a stunning surprise... A tiny region in its center is so bright that astronomers believe it's light is coming from a single object at least a billion times the mass of our sun... Inside this brilliant beacon, space suddenly turns dark... as it's literally swallowed by a giant black hole. As strange as they may seem, even huge black holes like these are thought to be products of the familiar universe of stars and gravity. They get their start in rare types of large stars... at least ten times the mass of our sun. These giants burn hot and fast... and die young. The star is a cosmic pressure-cooker. In its core, the crush of gravity produces such intense heat that atoms are stripped and rearranged. Lighter elements like hydrogen and helium fuse together...
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Kategorie: Dokumenty
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Hubbleův teleskop nám dává nahlédnout na kroniku zrození a smrti. Úžasné záběry nejmodernějšího teleskopu jaké kdy lidstvo poznalo. Astronauti se chystají na poslední přiblížení, aby mohli dokončit renovaci a opětovné vypuštění stařičkého Hubbleova vesmírného dalekohledu. Jelikož se jedná o velmi nebezpečnou misi, vyvstává otázka, zda dalekohled za takové riziko opravdu stojí. Hubbleův dalekohled byl klíčem, jenž otevřel truhlici tajemství vesmíru. Vydejte se s námi na výlet k dalekým hranicím vesmíru, při němž se seznámíte s epochálními objevy Hubbleova dalekohledu. Stanete se svědky toho, jak Hubbleův dalekohled zkoumal zrození hvězd a planet, věhlas supernov, vznik nebývale masivních černých děr, mapoval temnou hmotu a navždy tak změnil naše chápání reality. Na vlastní oči uvidíte, jak poodkryl zrod našeho vesmíru i konec času. Také zjistíte, jaké má NASA plány s tímto dalekohledem i jeho nástupcem, jímž je Vesmírný dalekohled Jamese Webba.
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The mind-blowing answer comes from a theory describing the birth of the universe in the first instant of time. The universe has long captivated us with its immense scales of distance and time. How far does it stretch? Where does it end... and what lies beyond its star fields... and streams of galaxies extending as far as telescopes can see? These questions are beginning to yield to a series of extraordinary new lines of investigation... and technologies that are letting us to peer into the most distant realms of the cosmos... But also at the behavior of matter and energy on the smallest of scales. Remarkably, our growing understanding of this kingdom of the ultra-tiny, inside the nuclei of atoms, permits us to glimpse the largest vistas of space and time. In ancient times, most observers saw the stars as a sphere surrounding the earth, often the home of deities. The Greeks were the first to see celestial events as phenomena, subject to human investigation... rather than the fickle whims of the Gods. One sky-watcher, for example, suggested that meteors are made of materials found on Earth... and might have even come from the Earth. Those early astronomers built the foundations of modern science. But they would be shocked to see the discoveries made by their counterparts today. The stars and planets that once harbored the gods are now seen as infinitesimal parts of a vast scaffolding of matter and energy extending far out into space. Just how far... began to emerge in the 1920s. Working at the huge new 100-inch Hooker Telescope on California's Mt. Wilson, astronomer Edwin Hubble, along with his assistant named Milt Humason, analyzed the light of fuzzy patches of sky... known then as nebulae. They showed that these were actually distant galaxies far beyond our own. Hubble and Humason discovered that most of them are moving away from us. The farther out they looked, the faster they were receding. This fact, now known as Hubble's law, suggests that there must have been a time when the matter in all these galaxies was together in one place. That time... when our universe sprung forth... has come to be called the Big Bang. How large the cosmos has gotten since then depends on how long its been growing... and its expansion rate. Recent precision measurements gathered by the Hubble space telescope and other instruments have brought a consensus... That the universe dates back 13.7 billion...
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Kategorie: Dokumenty
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It now seems that our entire universe is living on borrowed time. How long it can survive depends on whether Stephen Hawking's theory checks out. Special thanks to Ivan Bridgewater for use of footage. Time is flying by on this busy, crowded planet... as life changes and evolves from second to second. And yet the arc of human lifespan is getting longer: 65 years is the global average ... way up from just 20 in the Stone Age. Modern science, however, provides a humbling perspective. Our lives... indeed the life span of the human species... is just a blip compared to the age of the universe, at 13.7 billion years and counting. It now seems that our entire universe is living on borrowed time... And that even it may be just a blip within the grand sweep of deep time. Scholars debate whether time is a property of the universe... or a human invention. What's certain is that we use the ticking of all kinds of clocks... from the decay of radioactive elements to the oscillation of light beams... to chart and measure a changing universe... to understand how it works and what drives it. Our own major reference for the passage of time is the 24-hour day... the time it takes the Earth to rotate once. Well, it's actually 23 hours, 56 minutes and 4.1 seconds... approximately... if you're judging by the stars, not the sun. Earth acquired its spin during its birth, from the bombardment of rocks and dust that formed it. But it's gradually losing that rotation to drag from the moon's gravity. That's why, in the time of the dinosaurs, a year was 370 days... and why we have to add a leap second to our clocks about every 18 months. In a few hundred million years, we'll gain a whole hour. The day-night cycle is so reliable that it has come to regulate our internal chemistry. The fading rays of the sun, picked up by the retinas in our eyes, set our so-called "circadian rhythms" in motion. That's when our brains begin to secrete melatonin, a hormone that tells our bodies to get ready for sleep. Long ago, this may have been an adaptation to keep us quiet and clear of night-time predators. Finally, in the light of morning, the flow of melatonin stops. Our blood pressure spikes... body temperature and heart rate rise as we move out into the world. Over the days ... and years... we march to the beat of our biology. But with our minds, we have learned to follow time's trail out to longer and longer...
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